Jet ventilation: Complications

Advanced, Basic, Clinical Subspecialties

Jet ventilation: forced "inspiration" using high pressure oxygen sent directly into the airway (without an endotracheal tube); "expiration" is passive. Can be performed supraglottic, infraglottic, or transtracheal.

Complications:

  1. Does not provide definitive airway protection against secretions and aspiration

  2. Increased risk of airway fire

  3. Difficult to monitor end tidal CO2 so it’s difficult to monitor gas exchange/oxygenation unless you are able to draw ABG's

  4. Laryngospasm (reduced risk if you treat with topical lidocaine)

  5. GI insufflation which can result in trauma and/or aspiration

  6. Necrotizing tracheobrochitis from excessive mucosal drying if jet ventilation is performed for >2 hours without periodically using atomized saline for lubrication

  7. Various traumas related to high pressure gas input: pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, bleeding

92%

Answered correctly

2019

Year asked

76%

Answered correctly

2018

Year asked

86%

Answered correctly

2017

Year asked

86%

Answered correctly

2016

Year asked

Author
Mark Etter, MD